Management Tips

The New Direction In Cosmetic Dentistry, Part 1

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Harvey Silverman, DMD

In the last edition of Silverman On Smiles I addressed how to co-diagnose patients’ elective cosmetic dental needs. In the next 2 articles I am going to share a valuable technique that will teach you how to enhance that process.

Start With A Desire To Provide Non-Invasive Cosmetic Dentistry

I have been privileged to train/coach cosmetic dentists from Miami to Minneapolis and New York to Los Angeles for more than 20 years, helping dentists learn how to be the best cosmetic dentist possible. The lesson I can share with you is that dentists anywhere can incorporate these cosmetic practice-building techniques into their daily routine if they truly have an “eager desire.” What’s your level of interest when it comes to providing the best in elective cosmetic dentistry services to your patients? If it is high, you will like this article. If it needs to be reignited, I hope that this can flame your interest in providing non-invasive elective cosmetic dental services.

Read more: The New Direction In Cosmetic Dentistry, Part 1

 

A New Approach For Co-Diagnosing Elective Cosmetic Dentistry Needs/Wants

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Harvey Silverman, DMD

In the last edition of Silverman On Smiles: Cosmetic Dentistry SOS,I said that I would share with you a simple form that helps you determine what your patients want to change about their smile. While that sounds simple enough, if a “form” could do all of that, more dentists would provide elective cosmetic dentistry than they already do. Taking your cosmetic dentistry practice to the next level requires more than just a form. Let me share with you the approach I teach other dentists during my one day and 2 day regional and on-site Cosmetic Dentistry Boot Camp Programs. See if this approach fits your style as well.

Do Patient Education Material Drive Consumer Awareness?

Before I tell you about the form, let’s consider how effective patient education materials are in stimulating interest in smile enhancement services. Will they motivate your patient to ask if he or she is a candidate for cosmetic dentistry? To a limited degree, yes, they will. However, in the offices I coach on cosmetic dentistry, we found that relying too heavily on patient education materials isn’t the answer.

Read more: A New Approach For Co-Diagnosing Elective Cosmetic Dentistry Needs/Wants

 

How to Offer Patients the Best Elective Cosmetic Dentistry

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Harvey Silverman, DMD

How many patients do you and your hygienist see in a day? Ten, 15, more—whatever that number happens to be, stop right now and count how many elective cosmetic cases you did yesterday. Be honest. Was it one? Two? Three? Or none.

If you are like many dentists, the answer may sadly be none. I recently gave a presentation to a dental society and asked the dentists in attendance to let me know how many cosmetic cases they did for the entire week. I started with zero and to my surprise every dentist in the room raised their hand. No one had done a single elective cosmetic dentistry case. That’s when I knew it was time to roll up my sleeves and get to work.

Elective cosmetic dentistry is one of the few opportunities where dentists can use their artistic talents to create beautiful smiles patients choose to treat. Today nearly every dentist performs elective cosmetic dentistry. Some of us do more cosmetic dentistry than others, but it is rare to find a dentist who does not enjoy offering cosmetic services to their patients.

Read more: How to Offer Patients the Best Elective Cosmetic Dentistry

 

Take Your Cosmetic Practice To The Next Level

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Harvey Silverman, DMD

In this edition of Silverman On Smiles: Cosmetic Dentistry SOS I want to encourage you to consider the benefits of offering noninvasive veneers to your patients. It will make your elective cosmetic dentistry services more affordable while providing them with a beautiful, self-confident smile.

In the last edition in this series I described how a patient presented to the office, curious to learn if veneers could improve his smile. Finances were a concern and he had several job interviews. He has ruled out the possibility of orthodontia and did not like how the size and shape of his maxillary left lateral incisor made it look like he was missing a tooth. He wanted to know what affordable options were available.

The before photo shows the patients maxillary left lateral incisor. At times the patient feels as if it appears he is missing a tooth when he smiles.

Read more: Take Your Cosmetic Practice To The Next Level

 

Take Your Cosmetic Practice To The Next Level

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Harvey Silverman, DMD

In this edition of Silverman On Smiles: Cosmetic Dentistry SOS, I want to encourage you to consider the benefits of being a proactive presenter when discussing elective cosmetic dentistry with your patients. When you do, it will directly impact your elective cosmetic dentistry practice with positive results.

Case Study

A patient presents to the office, curious to learn if veneers could improve his smile. The patient recently graduated from college and now has several job interviews. Preparing for his interviews he would like to enhance the appearance of his maxillary left lateral incisor and have a more self-confident smile. His chief concern is that when he smiles, the size and shape of his maxillary left lateral incisor often makes it look like he is missing a tooth. He wants to know what can be done.

Read more: Take Your Cosmetic Practice To The Next Level

 

Take Your Cosmetic Practice To The Next Level

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Harvey Silverman, DMD

Would you like to expand your elective cosmetic dentistry practice? If your answer is “YES!” then you will enjoy reading this series, Silverman On Smiles: Cosmetic Dentistry SOS. In each article I will share time-tested management, marketing or technical simplification tips taught to other dentists during on-site cosmetic dentistry consultations. The goal of this series is to provide protocols that will have a positive impact on your practice and the patients you serve, therefore, each tip has been designed to be easy for you to incorporate into your private practice.

You might be wondering, “Why is there a need to develop a separate cosmetic management or marketing system? What’s not just keep doing what I have always been doing?” For the general dentist the reason is apparent. Elective cosmetic dentistry is want driven and general dentistry is need driven. Therefore there are distinct differences that allow you to be more effective when you are addressing elective issues than health oriented ones.

In many of the articles, I will share simplified technical skills that will provide long-lasting, beautiful, natural-looking results. However, since procedural skills are not the primary focus of these articles, I will not always provide step-by-step protocols. This series is being written for the dentist who already takes great pride in his/her aesthetic work and wants to find a professional way to inform, power educate and motivate patients about their cosmetic services.

Read more: Take Your Cosmetic Practice To The Next Level

   

Ten Steps for an Efficient, Stress-Free Recall Exam

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Michael D. Goldstein, DDS, FAGD

It’s impossible to pick up a journal or attend a dental seminar without being exposed to a host of ideas about how to “predictably” improve your efficiency and increase your income. Upgrading to the latest laser technology, learning efficient endo or implant techniques, and becoming a recognized cosmetic dentistry expert are just a few of the techniques often discussed. One seldom-mentioned subject is the periodic oral evaluation (0120), often called the recall or recare exam.

Think about it. If a dentist works 200 days per year with one dental hygienist who averages caring for eight recall patients per day, that dentist will perform 1,600 recall examinations per year. With two dental hygienists, that works out to 3,200… you get the idea. If it were possible to trim just four-minutes from each examination, a dentist working with one dental hygienist could potentially save 106.66 hours per year, or the equivalent of 13.33 eight-hour workdays. Since an average dentist’s time at chairside is worth $300 + per hour, I calculate a potential savings of at least $32,000 per year. Of course, if a dentist has more than one dental hygienist working with him or her, the savings would be greater. All that extra income for just making a few strategic changes to the way the recall examination is conducted. And as an extra bonus, the recall examination will be stress-free.

Read more: Ten Steps for an Efficient, Stress-Free Recall Exam

   

What Makes a Good Leader?

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Sandy Pardue

Many times dentists express interest in becoming a better leader. I always tell them that becoming a good leader is a process, one that never ends. You don’t have to be born with leadership skills, you can develop them. There are some clear characteristics found in good leaders.

Attributes of a Good Leader:

1) A good leader is ethical, they set a good example, they are trustworthy and believe in truth and doing the right things. They keep their word.

2) Good leaders are visionaries. They understand the importance of creating a vision and they know how to inspire everyone in the group to get on board. They bring the organization to another level.

3) Good leaders are also good listeners and are open to feedback. In fact, they encourage others to communicate their viewpoints. They know that it is important to include others and listen to fresh ideas. It is not only good for the organization, it helps build people that will help the leader improve conditions now and in the future.

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Tips for your Practice

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Linda Miles, CSP, CMC

Marketing Ideas

PATIENT APPRECIATION DAY

It’s external marketing that gets the phone to ring and new patients are certainly the lifeblood of the practice, but it’s the patients of record who refer to you and build your practice with their own personal dental care. Internal marketing is what keeps patients talking favorably about the practice. Once per month have a patient appreciation day where each patient seen that day receives a $5 to $10 useful gift that makes the person know you appreciate them. Your marketing committee (one team member from clinical assistants/one from hygiene/one from admin along with the practice manager) selects and wraps or bags gifts in advance. These can be bought locally, ordered online, or from a novelty catalog. On the last day of each month, pull a number one to 31 from a bowl. Keep pulling a number until you have a workday for the following month and that becomes the patient appreciation day. Patients love feeling special and will hope all their next appointments fall on that monthly lucky day. Cost: $10 in a solo practice with 30 patients each day $300 per month. Return on investment: priceless in good will and continued referrals.

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