New Study Shows Correlation Between Gum Disease, Heart Disease

There’s more evidence of the health problems that stem from poor oral health.

A new study by researchers at the Swedish college Uppsala University found that tooth loss and gum disease raise the risk of heart disease and diabetes. The research team determined that missing teeth increased the enzyme levels of a specific enzyme. It was also discovered that this enzyme raised the risk of inflammation and hardening in the arteries.

The risk increased for every missing tooth. There were even new risk factors added, including high blood pressure, bad cholesterol and the circumference of the waist. The people with fewer teeth were also at an increased risk of suffering from diabetes. Each missing tooth made the person 11 percent more likely to develop diabetes.

Despite the many recent studies that have linked heart health and overall health, there isn’t much data from patients diagnosed with heart problems and how gum disease impacted them before their heart problems.

The best way to avoid any possible health effects from poor oral health is to visit the dentist on a regular basis.