Today's Dental News

Good Nutrition Leads to a Healthy Mouth and Body

HARRISBURG, Pa.—Good nutrition and healthy eating habits are essential to maintaining optimal oral and overall health. With Halloween just around the corner, the Pennsylvania Dental Association (PDA) encourages parents to be mindful of the amount of candy their children are consuming, and to use this holiday as an opportunity to remind them about the importance of taking care of their teeth and gums.

The food and beverage choices you make have a direct effect on the health of your entire body. Each time a sugary snack or beverage is consumed, the sugar, along with the bacteria in your mouth, bathe your teeth in harmful acids that attack your teeth for at least 20 minutes. Each bite or sip brings on another acid attack. After repeat attacks, teeth are susceptible to tooth decay.

Read more: Good Nutrition Leads to a Healthy Mouth and Body

 

OHSU School of Dentistry Examines Antimicrobial Drug Interactions

PORTLAND, Ore.—Researchers at the Oregon Health & Science University School of Dentistry have found that a light-detecting biosensor system can quickly and effectively determine whether antibacterial treatments are working in patients with periodontitis, a serious gum infection that can cause tooth loss and is associated with an increased risk of heart attack or stroke and other serious health problems.

The OHSU team also found that the anesthetics lidocaine and prilocaine, and the antiseptic chlorhexidine do not interfere with the antibiotic minocycline hydrochloride when it is used to treat periodontal disease, and that the drugs can actually complement the antimicrobial activity of such treatment.

Read more: OHSU School of Dentistry Examines Antimicrobial Drug Interactions

   

New Motivation for Children and iPhone Fans to Brush Their Teeth

KREFELD, Germany—To many children, brushing their teeth is just a cumbersome chore, which leads to the same old frustrating battle in the bathroom between parents and their offspring. But now Krefeld-based psychiatrist Dr Einhardt Illing has developed an iPhone app that provides guidance and motivation for brushing—and a little bit of fun to boot.

The new tooth brushing motivator “Motivetrix” guides the user through brushing using color sequences and motivates them with imaginary painting. The iPhone screen shows a diagram of the human set of teeth and displays the individual tooth areas in different colors at intervals. The user follows the color sequence with his or her toothbrush. Brushing is complete when the whole set of teeth is colored in.

The imaginary coloring turns brushing into a game. The 2- to 3-minute brushing time specified by dentists is over in a flash.

Read more: New Motivation for Children and iPhone Fans to Brush Their Teeth

   

Dentists Try to Prevent Halloween Tooth Problems

The fear associated with Halloween has nothing to do with the history of the holiday for dentists.

Their fear is completely different. It involves the tooth problems that come from eating all the sugary and sticky candy that cause havoc to a child’s teeth.

That’s why dentists will try to step up the efforts of the Halloween Candy Buy-Back program. This program was started to limit the amount of tooth-harming candy that children consume on Halloween.

Children can bring candy to their dentists, who will then send the candy to Operation Gratitude, which is a military support center. The candy will be shipped along with other necessities for the troops as part of a holiday care package. The children can also write letters and send cards to the troops. For their good deed, children may receive money or some kind of goody bag.

Read more: Dentists Try to Prevent Halloween Tooth Problems

   

Space Technology-Inspired High-Resolution X-Ray Camera to Help Dentists

A Swedish company has taken inspiration from an advanced technique used for miniaturizing space hardware to make a visit to the dentist a little more comfortable.

The tiny new high-resolution x-ray camera captures pictures that are dramatically more detailed and with higher contrast than the conventional x-ray machines widely used.

The heart of the camera is a tiny ‘structured scintillator’ device that converts x-rays to visible light. The camera was designed by Scint-X and the scintillator was built by a Swedish company called Nanospace.

Read more: Space Technology-Inspired High-Resolution X-Ray Camera to Help Dentists

   

Page 150 of 164

Banner